1 Jul 2020

“We all need to be strong and fight this virus together.”


Terrica Moore is from Liberia, a Registered Nurse who studied Nursing at Mother Patten College of Health Sciences. She has been working at St Benedict Health Centre for the last two years. Because of the Ebola crisis in the past, she is psychologically more confident to keep calm during the pandemic. She uses this experience to take this situation even more seriously due to the number of friends and relatives she lost.

 

Tell us a bit about yourself.

My name is Terrica Moore, and I am a Registered General Nurse.

How are you coping with COVID-19? How are you feeling?

I am anxious and scared because people are not cooperating with protocols put in place to curtail the spread of the virus.

It is not the finest of moments the world could think of but that’s the situation in which we find ourselves so we are adapting and adjusting to it. However, there are fears but they are just normal.

How has your life changed since the outbreak?

Movement is restricted. I have a lot more work than the usual and work hours have increased.

What has been the most worrying thing so far?

Being confined is difficult. I miss home and my family. I get daily updates on the crisis, that way I don’t feel anxious. I share any news with my patients as well so they can also have an update on the pandemic.

Denial of the reality of the virus and the number of deaths recorded thus far. This is scary because it puts a lot of people at risk which means the case rate will only increase and more people could be infected.

How are you following the updates to include them in your daily life and work?

Visitation has stopped. Walks, baking sessions, sewing sessions have been replaced with handcrafts which makes it a one-way thing.

With the experience in the past with respect to Ebola, it gives me more psychological assurance and helps to reduce any agitation.

What has it changed regarding protocols at the Clinic and Unit?

Visitation, the total number of staff working, home visits, admissions, discharges have all been stopped temporarily and there is a change in the follow-up protocol.

What measures are you taking to avoid getting infected?

Proper hand hygiene and disinfecting surfaces and frequently used instruments. At the unit currently, we are on lockdown.

What are you doing to keep the patients safe?

We encourage hand hygiene, social distancing and recording temperatures at all times. We also educate clients on the virus and ways of managing it as we learn through it ourselves.

Do you think you are more prepared after Ebola?

Yes. With the experience in the past with respect to Ebola, it gives me more psychological assurance and helps to reduce any agitation. I try to use it as a reference to take this pandemic even more seriously due to the number of friends and relatives I lost. We all need to be strong and fight this virus together.

It is not the finest of moments the world could think of but that’s the situation in which we find ourselves

How are you keeping in contact with your loved ones?

I contact my relatives through phone calls and video calls.

Is there anything you would like to say to the Sisters Hospitallers community?

I would like to extend my thanks and appreciation to everyone associated with Sisters Hospitallers for providing me with a platform to care for the sick and give back to society. Not forgetting their enormous support to the unit. I would urge all to keep safe and keep to the protocols.